Ellis Meng Wins IEEE Sensors Council Technical Achievement Award

| November 5, 2019

Meng has been recognized for her career achievements in the field of biomedical microelectromechanical sensors.

Vice Dean for Technology Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Ellis Meng

Vice Dean for Technology Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Ellis Meng

Vice Dean for Technology Innovation and Entrepreneurship and Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Ellis Meng has been honored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers with the 2019 IEEE Sensors Council Technical Achievement Award, presented at the organization’s annual conference in Montreal on October 30.

The award was presented to Meng for her “pioneering contributions to biomedical microelectromechanical sensors and their applications for drug delivery and microfluidics, neural interfaces, and medical implants.”

The annual prize, awarded to advanced career researchers, celebrates awardees who have demonstrated outstanding and original technical contributions within the scope of the IEEE Sensors Council, through publications and patents.

Meng, a member of the USC Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience, established the USC Biomedical Microsystems Laboratory, which focuses on the development of micro- and nanotechnologies for biomedical purposes.

Her research interests include biomedical microelectromechanical systems (bioMEMS), implantable biomedical microdevices, microfluidics, microsensors and actuators, biocompatible polymer microfabrication and packaging and the development of thin, flexible polymer-based implantable materials that allow for better and safer mapping of the brain. She is also the co-founder of USC startup, Senseer, which is developing self-aware sensing devices that can vastly improve the treatment of hydrocephalus, a pediatric condition that causes excessive fluid in the brain.

In addition to this latest honor, during 2018 Meng was also named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, and won the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Technical Achievement Award.

Meng received her B.S. degree in engineering and applied science and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Pasadena, in 1997, 1998, and 2003.

She was previously Dwight C. and Hildagarde E. Baum Chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering from 2015-2018 and was an inaugural holder of a Gabilan Distinguished Professorship in Science and Engineering from 2016-2019.

Meng is a fellow of IEEE, ASME, BMES, AIMBE, and NAI.

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